Twenty-five years ago, our vision was to preserve the salmon habitat by building a recreational trail through the remnant forest, riparian areas and boardwalk over the wetlands that once protected salmon runs.

Visitors can now enjoy nature only a few yards from highly developed urban Silverdale and enjoy a salmon bearing creek, natural habitat and wildlife. 

For the past 25 years, the Clear Creek Task Force has been dedicated to the stewardship of this remarkable natural resource through educational programs, with the support of community volunteers, businesses and service organizations and gifts of funds, grants and expertise.

From the northern shores of Dyes Inlet, the main stem of Clear Creek meanders north for 3 miles before splitting in two. On north side of Highway 303, the west fork heads northwest under Highway 3 to Naval Base Kitsap Bangor. The east fork moves due north through former farmlands, now open space and the county’s mitigation bank, to the head waters off Mountain View Road. There are a number of secondary streams off the east and west forks of Clear Creek.

Clear Creek has Chum, Coho, Cutthroat and Steelhead, species that are well adapted to the shallower streams of the Kitsap Peninsula. There are also fresh water mussels, sculpins and lampreys, salamanders, frogs and beavers making for a diverse habitat.

Fishing for dinner, the many species of marine birds are plentiful with over-wintering loons, grebes and cormorants. Waterfowl includes wigeons, scoters, mergansers and goldeneyes. Herons ply the nearshore and eagles keep a sharp eye on the waters.

This pattern, Reforestation, is taken from a traditional Suquamish basket design